Sangria

01/24/2013

5 Comments

 
I spent eight hours on Thursday in a food safety class. While I was learning about proper food temperatures and how to keep a restaurant safe from terrorists (yes, really), I was thinking about this sangria. Nevermind that it was 10am, sangria was much more exciting than learning about the temperature danger zone. One of the most cringe worthy things about the class was that it said you should use precut and prepackaged items to minimize potential contamination. While I understand the premise behind that statement, I would never support that (and I think a lot of others would agree with me). It's much more expensive to buy prepackaged items, it kind of takes the fun out of cooking, and you give up a lot of the quality control to get it like that. Oh well.

The nice thing about this sangria is three fold. 1. It's easy. 2. You can add whatever kind of fruit to it that you'd like to flavor it. 3. It gets better with time, so you can prep it and let it sit and stew. One thing that I hate about sangria recipes is that they can be so ambiguous. I got sick of trying to figure it out each time, so I wrote it down a few times ago and haven't turned back since. I guarantee that if you make this for the Superbowl next weekend, people will be cheering for you, even if your last name isn't Harbaugh. 

Sangria Recipe
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Note: Use whichever fruits you prefer or what you have on hand. I always do an apple and strawberries (fresh or frozen) and then use whatever else I happen to have.

1 750 mL bottle Cabernet wine
2 cups orange juice
1/2 cup peach brandy
1/4 cup sugar
1 apple sliced
1 Meyer lemon sliced
1 cup frozen strawberries

In a large pitcher, stir together the wine, orange juice, brandy, and sugar. Add the fruit and let sit in the refrigerator for at least 4 hours but preferably overnight. Serve cold.
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Comments

01/25/2013 10:56am

I love Sangria and have never tried making it myself. What do you do for a living that you had to endure a food safety class? I am a microbiologist so to hear you say you had to attend a food safety class - I empathize! :)

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01/25/2013 9:42pm

OK I need to know... how DO you keep a restaurant safe from terrorists?

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At high altitude it is easy to cook because the boiling temperature would be low due to high pressure! Here some good as well as mouth watering pictures are shown and most interestingly their recipes are also given! Thanks for them!

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06/28/2013 4:28pm

I LOVE sangria so I am totally trying this!

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07/28/2013 12:11pm

The nice thing about this sangria is three fold and must admit your three points are very simple and considerable at the same time. Thank you a lot for sharing them with us.

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